Fiberglass Buyers Guide (Car Craft, March 1956): Part 9 – The Victress C2 Coupe

Hi Gang…

This is our ninth in a series of “spotlights” on sections of a Buyer’s Guide for fiberglass sports cars published by Car Craft in March, 1956.  Click on the link below to review all fiberglass cars discussed in this 1956 Buyer’s Guide as of today:

Click here to review all articles published on the Car Craft, March 1956 Buyer’s Guide

Today’s article focuses on the Victress C2 Coupe designed by Merrill Powell which debuted in ‘55 in Southern California.  The car shown in the Buyer’s Guide is most likely the first body pulled from the molds.  If you closely inspect the pictures, you’ll see it’s nice trimmed and cleaned, but not a finished car.

Luckily, we have all the original photography from this photo shoot (thanks to Merrill Powell, Bill Quirk, and Mel Keys) and we’ll present these original pictures in future stories here at Forgotten Fiberglass 🙂

Background: The Victress C2 Coupe

Merrill Powell joined Victress in late ’53 when it was owned by Doc Boyce-Smith and called “The Boyce-Smith Company.”  In early ’54, Merrill invested in the company and became Doc’s partner and Vice President of the newly formed company now called “Victress Manufacturing, Inc.

California Incorporation Records identify that Victress Manufacturing Inc., became a legal entity in California on February 15th, 1954, so less than 2 weeks from now Victress Manufacturing will be officially 58 years old.

We at Forgotten Fiberglass wish an early “Happy Birthday” to Victress Manufacturing and the men who built it!

And with that, let’s see what Car Craft had to say about the Victress C2 Coupe, designed by Merrill Powell.

Car Craft (March 1956): The Victress C2 Coupe

Car Craft (March 1956)
Victress C2 Coupe
Specifications

Wheelbase
  • 94 inches
Tread
  • 50 inches
Overall Length
  • 158 inches
Overall Height At Cowl
  • 55 and ½ inches
Overall Width
  • 70 inches
Body Kit Semi-Complete
  • $595.00
The above body is also available to fit the same chassis as the Victress S1-A roadster.  This coupe is called the Victress C-6   
For additional prices and information, write: Victress Manufacturing Company11823 Sherman WayNorth Hollywood, California

Poplar 5 – 5339

Summary:

Those eagle eyed fiber-fanatics may have noticed that Car Craft Magazine correctly identified that a larger Coupe based on the same style was available – but incorrectly called it the “C-6.”

Thankfully, 56 years later, we can correct this mistake here at Forgotten Fiberglass 😉

Hope you enjoyed the story, and until next time…

Glass on gang…

Geoff

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Comments

Fiberglass Buyers Guide (Car Craft, March 1956): Part 9 – The Victress C2 Coupe — 1 Comment

  1. I believe that when this article was published, the C-2 had been available for almost a year, and the C-3 (not C-6), for perhaps six months. I don’t know what chassis the C-2 pictured was mounted on, or what front and rear glass we designed it for—what records we had were lost long ago. Perhaps a C-2 owner out there can help with that.

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