Glasspar G2 Fastback Sports Car

Hi Gang…

A picture speaks a thousand words…

Not all hardtops are equal, and the one that Frank Cornell sent me pictures of recently is a sight to behold.  It’s a fastback hardtop, and it’s the first one I’ve seen.  I assume that the top comes off – but I could be wrong.  Frank thought it might be something offered by Glasspar so I ran the photos by the Tritt family for their thoughts.

Matt Tritt confirmed that this was something that must have been completed by a creative and talented unknown customer.  He had never seen it before, and confirmed that it was not a Glasspar item.  And that makes sense.   (Click here for a link to a story we ran some time ago about the 8 different style hardtops that Glasspar built for cars in the ’50s).

The first Glasspar G2 hardtop appeared on the Alembic I – in early 1952.   The Alembic was built at the bequest of Naugatuck Chemicals / U.S. Rubber, and was identical in many features to the original G2 – the Brooks Boxer.  It was the second G2 was ever built and had Bill Tritt’s first and only custom hardtop designed for a Glasspar G2 body.  In fact, the mold for this hardtop was used time and time again when customers purchased the now rare and often sought out Glasspar G2 hardtop for their custom sports car.

And Bill Tritt confided in me that he never did quite like the design of his hardtop.  “It’s a bit too high for the beltline and the design of my car,” he shared during one of our interviews.  “I would have liked to redesigned it, but you have to remember…..I was building a company and most of the business was in boats – not cars.  So I kept with what I had at the time – our first design for a G2 hardtop.”

So….enjoy the pictures and think back to the day when you could create the car of your dreams – with a lot of elbow grease and a great imagination.   And…perhaps Bill would approve of this “Fastback G2” design – it sure gives a different look to one neat G2 sports car!

 

 

 

Woodill Wildfire Fastback Hardtop

 One of the last Wildfires ever made was a prototype Woodill Wildfire fastback.  There are some similarities to each car – as you might imagine – and I thought you might enjoy seeing a picture of the Woodill Fastback here:

 

Summary:

We’re still digging for the history on this neat Glasspar G2, and with this car in our registry, Rodney Packwood and I have identified 68 Glasspar G2s that exist as of today.  Given only 100 bodies/cars were ever built, this is a great testimony to the style and quality of Bill Tritt’s wonderfully designed and built American sports car.

Hope you enjoyed the story, and until next time…

Glass on gang…

Geoff
——————————————————————–
* Click on the following link to view all stories on:  Glasspar G2 Sports Cars
——————————————————————–
* New Feature: To post your comments and thoughts about this story, scroll down the page and post your information in the section titled “Leave A Reply.”  Your name and e-mail address will be required, but only your name will appear – not your e-mail address.

* Click here to visit the Forgotten Fiberglass Forums and post your thoughts about vintage fiberglass cars.

* Click here to review the “Forgotten Fiberglass Vision Statement” as well as our “Approach to Research

* Click here to listen to our Podcast led by Todd Ruel of Gone Autos

* Click here to visit our Forgotten Fiberglass Facebook page

* Don’t Forget: We appreciate any and all donations to our Forgotten Fiberglass website.  Your donations help defray production costs.  To make a donation, look for the “Support Forgotten Fiberglass” box at the bottom right of our website and click on the word “Donate”.  All contributions help make “Forgotten Fiberglass” the best it can be.
——————————————————————-
Click on the Images Below to View Larger Pictures
——————————————————————-


Comments

Glasspar G2 Fastback Sports Car — 3 Comments

  1. I think I can see welting between the body and the top,so if thats true then it would indeed be removable..68 Glasspar G-2’s wow I wonder how many ever got finished..

    Mel

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *